Event celebrates the end of makahiki season

WCC graduate Kawika Meranda (center) prayed to the pohaku (stone) at the WiPCE 2014 event as a traditional challenge kane did during makahiki. The goal was to put the pohaku on his shoulder to show his strength – Courtesy of WCC Peer Mentoring Center

WCC graduate Kawika Meranda (center) prayed to the pohaku (stone) at the WiPCE 2014 event as a traditional challenge kane did during makahiki. The goal was to put the pohaku on his shoulder to show his strength – Courtesy of WCC Peer Mentoring Center

ASUH-WCC will celebrate the end of the makahiki season on Monday, Feb. 29 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on WCC’s Great Lawn. Students and their ‘ohana are welcome.

In the old Hawaiian days, the makahiki season was a time of celebration when wars between rival armies and other developments were put on hold. It was a time of peace overseen by Lono, the Hawaiian god of peace, fertility, agriculture and rainfall.

Traditionally, the season lasts from October through February, and marks the beginning of the new year. Makahiki also signifies a time of rest and rejuvenation for both land and people.

This will be WCC’s first makahiki celebration since 2007. The free event features traditional Hawaiian games such as ulu maika, free Hawaiian food, hula performances and entertainment by WCC’s very own Gus Cobb-Adams (DJ Gusty Gus).

Free event t-shirts will be given out to the first 100 attendees so that students can print their own kapala (Hawaiian stamp art) designs. Student volunteers from WCCʻs Ku Pono Hawaiian Club will be on hand to assist with activities and to educate participants about Native Hawaiian culture.

Given WCC’s strong Hawaiian Studies program, ASUH-WCC coordinators felt it was appropriate to host the celebration of makahiki season as both an educational and cultural experience for the students and community.

“Our main goal is to have the whole school come together,” said Nicole (Nani) Daniluck, ASUH-WCC coordinator. “We hope this to be an annual thing, so more students can get involved over time.”

This year’s event was funded by several sources: ASUH-WCC for the food, Ke Kumu Pali for the t-shirts and Blanche Pope Elementary School for the game supplies.

 

by Dutches K. Richards, Ka ‘Ohana Staff Reporter