Students explore creativity through video journalism

 

Journalism instructor Kimberlee Bassford conducts an interview for her 2008 PBS documentary Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority – Courtesy of Kimberlee Bassford

Journalism instructor Kimberlee Bassford conducts an interview for her 2008 PBS documentary Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority – Courtesy of Kimberlee Bassford

This semester, WCC is offering a new course, JOUR 270: Introduction to Multimedia Storytelling, in which students learn how to use video, audio and photography to report news and documentary stories for the web and other distribution platforms.

According to journalism instructor and Ka ʻOhana faculty adviser Kimberlee Bassford, anyone interested in video or filmmaking should consider the course.

“You’re going to learn the basics of everything,” Bassford said. “It will make you more well-rounded.”

“Kim is very knowledgeable and leads us to the things we need to know in a very concise and understandable way,” said student Cynthia Lee Sinclair.

After completing the course, students will be able to produce various news videos and short documentaries independently or in groups that meet professional journalistic standards and ethics.

Students will also be able to apply basic knowledge and skills in digital video production like cinematography, sound and editing.

“I think it’s important because when you go into your professional lives you may specialize as a producer or cinematographer,” said Bassford. However, she added, “I want my students to understand storytelling. I think that’s more important than anything else.”

JOUR 270 also teaches students how to critically understand news videos and documentaries produced by the mass media.

“The state of journalism is moving to the multimedia realm,” she said. “There aren’t as many people necessarily reading the newspaper, but they’re watching the news online or on their phones.”

Rebecca Miyashiro, an alumna of WCC, recently decided to pursue a bachelor’s degree in creative media.

“I am highly interested in music production so I kind of wanted to learn other skills that would accompany that.”

“People think I’m not gonna be a journalist or a filmmaker, but nowadays with our smartphones we’re always taking pictures,” Bassford said.

“I am excited when I come to class because this class combines creativity with structure,” Miyashiro said. “Things that didn’t interest me before are starting to interest me now. I feel a slight adrenaline rush.”

 

by Taylor James Kipapa, Ka ‘Ohana Staff Reporter